Tag Archives: flying geese quilt

Custom four-by-eight quilt

IMG_1144Just finished the last of a flurry of custom orders! It has been so much fun working on quilts that I know are going to happy homes. This cutie is for a baby on the way in Texas. Baby quilts are my absolute favorite size to make. I work on a Janome Gem, which I recently learned is 3/4 size (!), and even though I’ve made a few queen size quilts on it, it’s much happier working on a smaller scale. The backing for this quilt is a great organic cotton that I happened to have on hand–it’s such a perfect fit with the colors my client picked. I love that it has a little shimmer in some of the dots.

IMG_1148My shelves in my little shop are pretty bare but it’s time to work on some things for my house and holiday presents. Up next, a tablecloth for Thanksgiving and leaf coasters. Plus a surprise quilt that I am super excited about. I’m going to post about this quilt as I go, so more posts on this WIP coming soon.

Four times eight, a new modern baby quilt

drape I’ve had it in mind for months to make a baby sized version of my Three Flocks design. My starting point was a lovely print from Leah Duncan’s collection called “Morning Walk” that I picked for the backing. I guess I am literally working back-to-front, but it works for me! The print is so charming and subtle–I love that it hints at floral but is still a simple geometric pattern. I took my palette for the flying geese from the print’s muted primary colors and added some salmon, peach and aqua.

My original “Three Flocks” quilt has three big triangles made of decreasing rows of flying geese triangles. I knew that I would only have two “flocks” in a baby size quilt, and would have one less row in each big triangle. Once I had all my triangles made and ready to arrange, I discovered the design just didn’t look right in the smaller frame of the crib size quilt. Something about having two big triangles made the design feel sort of heavy. I think that old design theory–things are always better in odd numbers–must be right!

fullOr maybe not, the design I ended up with has eight blocks of four triangles–nothing odd about that. This layout seemed to fit the size of the baby quilt better and gave a little more breathing room for the colors.

The binding is Kona Ochre, also used as one of the triangle colors. I played around with different options for the binding (including some patterns!), but I really like the warmth of the ochre. I can’t resist adding this picture that includes the newest member of our family–Olive!

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I’ve added this quilt to my Etsy shop!

Three flocks quilt

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I set out to make a colorful quilt with plenty of white space for my bedroom. I knew I wanted to include triangles in the design, but wanted to keep it fairly simple. Originally, my thought was to have three rectangular blocks of triangles. I liked the idea of having one column of triangles in each block with the background and foreground reversed. But, what seemed great in my head and looked promising on sketch paper felt sort of heavy and static when I laid out the fabric triangles. A little playing around and I came up with the big triangles.

IMG_0476Because this quilt was intended for a specific space, I tested out different layouts on my bed. It was really helpful to see how the design would work on the surface of the bed–by eliminating the sides of the quilt from the visual field. I think this technique is especially useful for larger quilts. (Plus I don’t have space for a design wall, so my bed makes a pretty great surface for experimenting with layouts.)

IMG_0272This design has the right balance of white and color that I was looking for. The colors are unusual for me, but I love how cheerful they are. I used a print from Leah Duncan’s Meadow collection for the backing, with a little bit of orange at the top. The binding is from Carolyn Friedlander’s Architextures collection. I like how the gray adds a dash of sophistication to the palette.

IMG_0484I quilted using the diagonal edges of the triangles as guides to create a grid. I was really pleased how the quilting lines create a sort of argyle effect. The lines are spaced two inches apart, which gives the quilt a really soft and cozy feel.

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