Category Archives: kids stuff

Quilt for kids–quilted!

IMG_2148This quilt has been an unexpected pleasure to work on. Although it would have been a lot simpler to have known the final design from the beginning, the false starts were a great learning experience. I think the final design has a sort of superhero/super star vibe that is perfect for kids.

IMG_2141For the quilting, I extended the lines from the star to the edges and then stitched in the ditch around the square frames. There is a little puckering at the bottom of the quilt where the frames and the rays from the star intersect–grr. I don’t think it will be very noticeable after the quilt is washed, but I would love to know how to prevent this from happening. (This is why I love quilting in a diamond grid–nice and smooth every time!) The backing fabrics are two Denyse Schmidt prints from Jo-Ann Fabrics. I wasn’t sure the prints would work, but I really like how they look with the quilt top. All that’s left to do is the binding. I am leaning toward charcoal. Too dull? I also have a gold honeycomb print in my stash that might be good?

Quilts for kids–progress!

IMG_2131This quilt top is finally starting to come together but not at all how I expected. I thought I would branch out from solids and simple design when I decided to use the star block from my guild exchange. I had fun making a bunch of stars in blues, reds, and a little hot pink. I made a few tries at piecing them together–and came up with a design I thought would work. A strip of the new stars next to the UFO star placed in a log cabin sounded good to me. Then I made the log cabin (or is this properly called a housetop?). It is so simple and fun. Here it is with the strip of stars. They just don’t seem to fit with the bold log cabin. So, I think that strip of stars will find its way into my own UFO pile (not to mention the extra squares I cut and the scraps created!)

IMG_2124Here it is without the stars–the outer square is a really pretty French blue–not as dark as it appears here. I think this plainer design is perfect for a charity quilt, since I don’t know who the quilt will belong to. I also like that it will be great for a boy but could also appeal to a girl.

IMG_2120I really love how this is ending up. I am not sure how I feel about my inability to work outside my comfort zone. Either I have really strong feelings about design or a limited imagination. At least, I can say I know what I like!

Charity quilt, getting started

My guild, Gainesville Modern Quilters, decided to do a UFO (unfinished objects) swap and then make charity quilts with the exchanges. We plan to link up with SwimBikeQuilt’s 100 Quilts for Kids. I chose this lovely block that was hand-pieced by Mary’s grandmother.

IMG_2098I really want to make something special with this block. I was thinking that red and blue eight-point stars and some flying geese would suit the original design. But then I saw a very pretty star block on Hyacinth Quilt Design (from the book Simply Retro by Camille Roskelley) that I think might be just perfect.

hyacinthstarI also love the palette in this quilt from Spotted Stone Studio–I love the mix of navy and red with the soft pinks and gold–so pretty!

spotted stone studioHere are some of the fabrics I’ve pulled so far to work on this–and a big piece of white, which I plan to use lots of!

IMG_2096I am really excited about this project. Taking something rooted in family and traditional quilting and making something modern is super appealing. Plus, I’ve been making quilts for my Etsy shop, which is exciting and fun, but making a quilt for a child in need is a very different feeling. I look forward to sharing my progress–which should be fairly rapid since we are meeting the first week in September to gather our finished quilts!

Coral stripe quilt

_DSC0701

I was so pleased with my last nautical baby quilt that I had to try another. Instead of an appliqued embellishment, I added a small patch of Liberty Betsy Blue. The end result is unintentionally perfect for July Fourth–but I think it has year-round appeal. I just love the Kona coral–so cheerful and it seems to go nicely with almost any color. I read somewhere that everyone looks good in red and the same seems to be true with quilts. A little bit of red (or coral) is always a plus in my book.

_DSC0669

I just added this quilt to my Etsy shop!

Tiny dress and wee backpack

Before she left for camp, my daughter suggested that her Bunny needed a new summer dress, and that Bunny would probably like this Liberty print–Hot Pink Wiltshire (gorgeous!).9522_zoomI guess Bunny and Betty have excellent taste in fabric. For the dress, I made a paper pattern from Bunny’s existing dress. I machine stitched the side seams and serged the edges, then hand sewed the hem, neck and armholes using a blanket stitch. A perfect fit!

_DSC0653

Piglet is her other sleeping pal, so I thought he deserved something, too. This little backpack was really fun to make. I had a rough idea of how to make it, but made it up as I went along. I am seriously spatially challenged (never ask me for directions) so sewing the flap, straps and lining to the exterior in the correct orientation took a few tries–but it’s good to exercise my brain, right? I wish I had placed the straps closer together at the top for a better fit, but otherwise it’s pretty awesome. I got completely carried away and put some salt water taffy and a welcome home note in the backpack for Betty to find on her return from camp. Aww!

_DSC0659

 

_DSC0663

Besides needing a distraction from missing my kiddo, I am also procrastinating a little. I bought three yards (!) of Liberty (Betsy Blue) to make a Lisette Traveler Dress. I made one version of the dress last year, so I know the pattern is not beyond my skill level, but I need to work up the courage to cut into this lovely fabric. I got some delightful encouragement from Florence at Flossie Teacakes, who very kindly replied to my question about prewashing fabric for dressmaking. Florence is a seamstress extrordinaire, a charming writer, and a Liberty expert so it was a real treat to correspond with her. The answer, by the way, is an emphatic yes.

Nautical baby quilt

_DSC0647Anyone who knows me, knows that I love stripes. I bought my first striped bateau shirt from Isle of You (!) in Ithaca, NY, and I have had at least one in my wardrobe ever since. My husband and I just visited Charleston, SC, for the first time. It is a very jaunty town with nautical stripes at every turn. Just my sort of place. I came home inspired to use my favorite pattern in a little baby quilt. This cream and navy stripe is the classic Breton pattern, with a broad band of cream at the top. I hand appliqued the heart at the top–I like how the red pops and adds a little more fun.

_DSC0628

I was excited to use wool batting for the first time–wool is such a great material for a baby blanket. Wool keeps little ones cool in summer and warm in winter, and is incredibly cozy. Best of all, the batting is superwash wool and can be machine washed and dried. I thought it might be difficult to sew–especially since you stitch with the batting facing out–but it was really lovely to work with. The pattern is adapted from the Purl Bee Lap Duvet. (I used Kona quilting cotton rather than double gauze and lengthened the quilting stitches to make this quilt durable enough to withstand lots of washings.) I really like how the lack of binding and the minimal quilting makes this quilt so lofty, and the wool is lighter than even the lightest cotton batting. This quilt would work equally well as a play mat, stroller blanket, or crib blanket.

_DSC0621

I tried all kinds of patterned fabrics for the backing but ended up using the solid cream. I like the sweet simplicity of the finished quilt.

You can find this quilt in my Etsy shop!

I am thinking of making a cream and coral version next…

Quilt photograhpy

_DSC0545I am so excited to be opening my Etsy shop, Brigit Gail. Ever since I started quilting, I’ve wondered what would happen when I ran out of beds in my home or babies to make quilts for. Would I have to stop making quilts or stack my beauties in a closet? I can’t quite convince my husband that hanging quilts on the wall is really great design–no matter how pretty the quilt–and an unused quilt is a sad thing. Quilts are meant to snuggle under, picnic on, and travel with. Opening an Etsy shop is the perfect solution. It couldn’t be easier–Etsy is a modern marvel. Except for the photography. The bright colors that I love, it turns out, are very hard to capture accurately. The pink (Kona cotton camellia) in this quilt was especially tricky. My husband has been a very patient assistant–see the very edges of his fingers holding oh so steady? And, here is a close up …

_DSC0533